python_utils package

Submodules

python_utils.converters module

python_utils.converters.scale_1024(x, n_prefixes)[source]

Scale a number down to a suitable size, based on powers of 1024.

Returns the scaled number and the power of 1024 used.

Use to format numbers of bytes to KiB, MiB, etc.

>>> scale_1024(310, 3)
(310.0, 0)
>>> scale_1024(2048, 3)
(2.0, 1)
>>> scale_1024(0, 2)
(0.0, 0)
>>> scale_1024(0.5, 2)
(0.5, 0)
>>> scale_1024(1, 2)
(1.0, 0)
python_utils.converters.to_float(input_, default=0, exception=(<type 'exceptions.ValueError'>, <type 'exceptions.TypeError'>), regexp=None)[source]

Convert the given input_ to an integer or return default

When trying to convert the exceptions given in the exception parameter are automatically catched and the default will be returned.

The regexp parameter allows for a regular expression to find the digits in a string. When True it will automatically match any digit in the string. When a (regexp) object (has a search method) is given, that will be used. WHen a string is given, re.compile will be run over it first

The last group of the regexp will be used as value

>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc')
'0.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('1')
'1.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123.456', regexp=True)
'123.46'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123', regexp=True)
'123.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc0.456', regexp=True)
'0.46'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123.456', regexp=re.compile('(\d+\.\d+)'))
'123.46'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('123.456abc', regexp=re.compile('(\d+\.\d+)'))
'123.46'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123.46abc', regexp=re.compile('(\d+\.\d+)'))
'123.46'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123abc456', regexp=re.compile('(\d+(\.\d+|))'))
'123.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc', regexp='(\d+)')
'0.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123', regexp='(\d+)')
'123.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('123abc', regexp='(\d+)')
'123.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123abc', regexp='(\d+)')
'123.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc123abc456', regexp='(\d+)')
'123.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('1234', default=1)
'1234.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc', default=1)
'1.00'
>>> '%.2f' % to_float('abc', regexp=123)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
TypeError: unknown argument for regexp parameter
python_utils.converters.to_int(input_, default=0, exception=(<type 'exceptions.ValueError'>, <type 'exceptions.TypeError'>), regexp=None)[source]

Convert the given input to an integer or return default

When trying to convert the exceptions given in the exception parameter are automatically catched and the default will be returned.

The regexp parameter allows for a regular expression to find the digits in a string. When True it will automatically match any digit in the string. When a (regexp) object (has a search method) is given, that will be used. WHen a string is given, re.compile will be run over it first

The last group of the regexp will be used as value

>>> to_int('abc')
0
>>> to_int('1')
1
>>> to_int('abc123')
0
>>> to_int('123abc')
0
>>> to_int('abc123', regexp=True)
123
>>> to_int('123abc', regexp=True)
123
>>> to_int('abc123abc', regexp=True)
123
>>> to_int('abc123abc456', regexp=True)
123
>>> to_int('abc123', regexp=re.compile('(\d+)'))
123
>>> to_int('123abc', regexp=re.compile('(\d+)'))
123
>>> to_int('abc123abc', regexp=re.compile('(\d+)'))
123
>>> to_int('abc123abc456', regexp=re.compile('(\d+)'))
123
>>> to_int('abc123', regexp='(\d+)')
123
>>> to_int('123abc', regexp='(\d+)')
123
>>> to_int('abc', regexp='(\d+)')
0
>>> to_int('abc123abc', regexp='(\d+)')
123
>>> to_int('abc123abc456', regexp='(\d+)')
123
>>> to_int('1234', default=1)
1234
>>> to_int('abc', default=1)
1
>>> to_int('abc', regexp=123)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
TypeError: unknown argument for regexp parameter: 123
python_utils.converters.to_str(input_, encoding=u'utf-8', errors=u'replace')[source]

Convert objects to string, encodes to the given encoding

Return type:str
>>> to_str('a')
b'a'
>>> to_str(u'a')
b'a'
>>> to_str(b'a')
b'a'
>>> class Foo(object): __str__ = lambda s: u'a'
>>> to_str(Foo())
'a'
>>> to_str(Foo)
"<class 'python_utils.converters.Foo'>"
python_utils.converters.to_unicode(input_, encoding=u'utf-8', errors=u'replace')[source]

Convert objects to unicode, if needed decodes string with the given encoding and errors settings.

Return type:unicode
>>> to_unicode(b'a')
'a'
>>> to_unicode('a')
'a'
>>> to_unicode(u'a')
'a'
>>> class Foo(object): __str__ = lambda s: u'a'
>>> to_unicode(Foo())
'a'
>>> to_unicode(Foo)
"<class 'python_utils.converters.Foo'>"

python_utils.formatters module

python_utils.formatters.camel_to_underscore(name)[source]

Convert camel case style naming to underscore style naming

If there are existing underscores they will be collapsed with the to-be-added underscores. Multiple consecutive capital letters will not be split except for the last one.

>>> camel_to_underscore('SpamEggsAndBacon')
'spam_eggs_and_bacon'
>>> camel_to_underscore('Spam_and_bacon')
'spam_and_bacon'
>>> camel_to_underscore('Spam_And_Bacon')
'spam_and_bacon'
>>> camel_to_underscore('__SpamAndBacon__')
'__spam_and_bacon__'
>>> camel_to_underscore('__SpamANDBacon__')
'__spam_and_bacon__'
python_utils.formatters.timesince(dt, default='just now')[source]

Returns string representing ‘time since’ e.g. 3 days ago, 5 hours ago etc.

>>> now = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> timesince(now)
'just now'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=1))
'1 second ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=2))
'2 seconds ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=60))
'1 minute ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=61))
'1 minute and 1 second ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=62))
'1 minute and 2 seconds ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=120))
'2 minutes ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=121))
'2 minutes and 1 second ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=122))
'2 minutes and 2 seconds ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3599))
'59 minutes and 59 seconds ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3600))
'1 hour ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3601))
'1 hour and 1 second ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3602))
'1 hour and 2 seconds ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3660))
'1 hour and 1 minute ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3661))
'1 hour and 1 minute ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3720))
'1 hour and 2 minutes ago'
>>> timesince(now - datetime.timedelta(seconds=3721))
'1 hour and 2 minutes ago'
>>> timesince(datetime.timedelta(seconds=3721))
'1 hour and 2 minutes ago'

python_utils.import_ module

exception python_utils.import_.DummyException[source]

Bases: exceptions.Exception

python_utils.import_.import_global(name, modules=None, exceptions=<class 'python_utils.import_.DummyException'>, locals_=None, globals_=None, level=-1)[source]

Import the requested items into the global scope

WARNING! this method _will_ overwrite your global scope If you have a variable named “path” and you call import_global(‘sys’) it will be overwritten with sys.path

Args:
name (str): the name of the module to import, e.g. sys modules (str): the modules to import, use None for everything exception (Exception): the exception to catch, e.g. ImportError locals_: the locals() method (in case you need a different scope) globals_: the globals() method (in case you need a different scope) level (int): the level to import from, this can be used for relative imports

python_utils.logger module

class python_utils.logger.Logged[source]

Bases: object

Class which automatically adds a named logger to your class when interiting

Adds easy access to debug, info, warning, error, exception and log methods

>>> class MyClass(Logged):
...     def __init__(self):
...         Logged.__init__(self)
>>> my_class = MyClass()
>>> my_class.debug('debug')
>>> my_class.info('info')
>>> my_class.warning('warning')
>>> my_class.error('error')
>>> my_class.exception('exception')
>>> my_class.log(0, 'log')
classmethod debug(msg, *args, **kwargs)

Log a message with severity ‘DEBUG’ on the root logger.

classmethod error(msg, *args, **kwargs)

Log a message with severity ‘ERROR’ on the root logger.

classmethod exception(msg, *args, **kwargs)

Log a message with severity ‘ERROR’ on the root logger, with exception information.

classmethod info(msg, *args, **kwargs)

Log a message with severity ‘INFO’ on the root logger.

classmethod log(lvl, msg, *args, **kwargs)

Log ‘msg % args’ with the integer severity ‘level’ on the root logger.

classmethod warning(msg, *args, **kwargs)

Log a message with severity ‘WARNING’ on the root logger.

python_utils.terminal module

python_utils.terminal.get_terminal_size()[source]

Get the current size of your terminal

Multiple returns are not always a good idea, but in this case it greatly simplifies the code so I believe it’s justified. It’s not the prettiest function but that’s never really possible with cross-platform code.

Returns:
width, height: Two integers containing width and height

python_utils.time module

python_utils.time.format_time(timestamp, precision=datetime.timedelta(0, 1))[source]

Formats timedelta/datetime/seconds

>>> format_time('1')
'0:00:01'
>>> format_time(1.234)
'0:00:01'
>>> format_time(1)
'0:00:01'
>>> format_time(datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6))
'2000-01-02 03:04:05'
>>> format_time(datetime.date(2000, 1, 2))
'2000-01-02'
>>> format_time(datetime.timedelta(seconds=3661))
'1:01:01'
>>> format_time(None)
'--:--:--'
>>> format_time(format_time)  
Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
TypeError: Unknown type ...
python_utils.time.timedelta_to_seconds(delta)[source]

Convert a timedelta to seconds with the microseconds as fraction

Note that this method has become largely obsolete with the timedelta.total_seconds() method introduced in Python 2.7.

>>> from datetime import timedelta
>>> '%d' % timedelta_to_seconds(timedelta(days=1))
'86400'
>>> '%d' % timedelta_to_seconds(timedelta(seconds=1))
'1'
>>> '%.6f' % timedelta_to_seconds(timedelta(seconds=1, microseconds=1))
'1.000001'
>>> '%.6f' % timedelta_to_seconds(timedelta(microseconds=1))
'0.000001'

Module contents